Sangiovese 2010

A smooth, medium bodied wine with traditional Italian flare. Six months of barrel aging boasts a down-to-earth bouquet. Dark fruited and supple on the palate, with a pleasant enduring finish.

Wine

Chambourcin

Sangiovese (san-jo-veh-zeh[1] [sandʒoˈveːze]) is a red Italian wine grape variety whose name derives from the Latin sanguis Jovis, "the blood of Jove".[2] The most accredited theory about the origin of Sangiovese is in Romagna in the Town of Santarcangelo where the Romans would store the wine in Grotte Tufacee (caves) inside the Mons Jovis. Though it is the grape of most of central Italy from Romagna down to Lazio, Campania and Sicily, outside Italy it is most famous as the main component of the blend Chianti, Carmignano, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and Morellino di Scansano, although it can also be used to make varietal wines such as Brunello di Montalcino, Rosso di Montalcino or Sangiovese di Romagna, as well as modern "Super Tuscan" wines like Tignanello.[3] Young Sangiovese has fresh fruity flavours of strawberry and a little spiciness, but it readily takes on oaky, even tarry, flavors when aged in barrels.

Grapes

Wines made from Sangiovese tend to exhibit the grape's naturally high acidity as well as moderate to high tannin content and light color. Blending can have a pronounced effect on enhancing or tempering the wine's quality. The dominant nature of Cabernet can sometimes have a disproportionate influence on the wine, even overwhelming Sangiovese character with black cherry, black currant, mulberry and plum fruit. Even percentages as low as 4 to 5% of Cabernet Sauvignon can overwhelm the Sangiovese if the fruit quality is not high.[1] As the wine ages, some of these Cabernet dominant flavors can soften and reveal more Sangiovese character. Different regions will impart varietal character on the wine with Tuscan Sangiovese having a distinctive bitter-sweet component of cherry, violets and tea.

 

(from Wikipedia)